KENYA

Kenyan Proverb: Hakuna Matata – No Worries

Despite being one of the strongest economies in East Africa there is a huge divide between rich and poor and more than half of the 45 million Kenyans live under the poverty line and are chronically malnourished. Around 80% of Kenyans live in rural areas and their livelihoods depend on subsistence and pastoral farming. Although Kenya is diverse ecologically and has good ground for farming in some regions; unpredictable weather, droughts and flooding all contribute to poverty particularly for subsistence farmers in the northern territories bordering South Sudan. Grossly unequal distribution of wealth, corruption, a fast rising population and large numbers of refugees from Somalia and South Sudan all add to high poverty in the country. In 2014 Action Against Hunger helped 300,612 people through food security and nutritional support programmes.

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Samaki wa Kupaka – Mchuzi wa Mbaazi – Kachumbari

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As with all nations, Kenya’s cuisine is very regional with a few dishes being attributed to the country as a whole. This includes kachumbari which actually has identical ingredients with Latin America’s pico de gallo. My chosen main is from the Indian Ocean coastal region where fish is number one! Similarly the coconut milk in the bean stew is an addition by the coastal region to a countrywide dish.

Ingredients 

Samaki wa Kupaka

Grilled Fish with Tamarind

  • Fish – I used seabass because that’s what I had in the freezer. Traditionally Tilapia is used and it’s cooked as a whole fish instead of fillets.
  • Ginger
  • Garlic
  • Chilli
  • Coconut milk
  • Lime juice
  • Tamarind paste
  • Coriander
  • Coconut oil
  • Salt

Mchuzi wa Mbaazi

Kidney Beans in Coconut Milk

  • Kidney beans
  • Coconut milk
  • Shallot
  • Garlic
  • Chilli
  • Cumin seeds
  • Stock cube
  • Coconut oil

Kachumbari

Tomato and Onion Salad

  • Tomatoes
  • Spring onion – I HATE raw onion so I substituted red onion for spring onion
  • Coriander
  • Lime juice
  • Olive oil
  • Sugar
  • Salt & Pepper

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Method

Samaki wa Kupaka

Grilled Fish with Tamarind

  1. In a pestle and mortar make a paste of chilli, garlic and ginger – Putting a little salt in will make a smoother paste
  2. Slash the skin of the fish (on both sides if using a whole fish) and rub the the paste all over the fish and inside the the incisions. Cover the fish and place in the fridge to marinade for at least 1 hour.
  3. Just before cooking heat some coconut oil in a pan. Scrape excess paste from the fish and add to the oil, then once lightly fried pour over a small amount of coconut milk then stir in tamarind paste. the result should be a thick, slightly sticky consistency kind of like BBQ sauce.
  4. Add coconut oil to a hot grill pan, paste both sides of the fish with the tamarind sauce and immediately place skin side down in the very hot grill pan.
  5. Serve with rice, fresh coriander and a dollop of the tamarind sauce.

Mchuzi wa Mbaazi

Kidney Beans in Coconut Milk

  1. In a mini chopper whiz up a couple of shallots, garlic and chilli.
  2. Toast cumin seeds in coconut oil then add the shallot, garlic and chilli. Once cooked slightly add a tin of coconut milk and simmer at an low temperature.
  3. When the sauce is reduced slightly crumble in a stock cube, add a healthy amount of fresh coriander and a tin of kidney beans.
  4. Keep cooking on a low heat until you have a fragrant stew.

Kachumbari

Tomato and Onion Salad

  1. Roughly chop tomatoes, thinly slice spring onion and mix with coriander, a pinch of sugar, salt & pepper, olive oil and lime juice.

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Enjoy!

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10 thoughts on “KENYA

  1. Pingback: The Countries | Sophia's Global Food Challenge

      • Yeah, Kenya is really beautiful. I have also been to Nigeria, Benin Republic, Morocco, Burkina Faso, Congo Republic, and D.R Congo (where I’m from). Have you been to any African countries?

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      • There are so many dishes in Congo, we almost always have samaki and nyama with our meals. We have pondu (Kassava leaves), maragi or madesu (beans) and other vegetables are part of our main diet. The sides to go with them include rice, potatoes, sweet potatoes, fufu. In Burkina Faso, I did most of my cooking (I lived there for 5 months), but when I had local food it was often grilled chicken with platain (those some of the best grilled chicken I have ever had). I also had a favourite west African dish of mine: pounded yam with goat meat. I have always been fascinated by Egypt history and would love to visit the country one day. Whereabouts did you go in Morocco?

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      • Mmmm I love pondu! Thanks for the tip about Burkina Faso, it’s on my list so I’ll make grilled chicken on your recommendation 🙂 pounded yam and goat meat sounds so good as well. Your’re lucky! Where do you live now?

        I travelling from the north of Morocco down to Marrakesh which was really a beautiful journey

        Liked by 1 person

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