SPAIN

Spanish Proverb: Al hambre de siete dias, no hay pan duro – For a good appetite there is no hard bread

Action Against Hunger operates from 5 host countries; one of which is Spain. The charity works to tackle child malnutrition and provide access to safe water.

Donate here to support their work: https://www.justgiving.com/Sophia-Vassie

Baked Cod with Chickpeas and Saffron 

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Like all countries Spain’s cuisine differs greatly from region to region. Arabic influence is particularly prevalent in the south of the country with ingredients such as saffron and chickpeas brought over in the middle ages.

Ingredients

Serves 2

  • 2 fillets of cod (or any other sustainably sourced firm white fish)
  • 3 handfuls of baby plum tomatoes
  • 1 tin of chickpeas
  • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • 4 shallots
  • 1 pinch of saffron
  • 1 sprig of fresh rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon of sugar
  • Olive oil
  • Salt & Pepper

Method

  1. Start by finely slicing shallots and adding to a pan with oil, cook till caramelised. Add sliced garlic, fresh rosemary and the baby plum tomatoes and cook down.
  2. Soak a pinch of saffron in hot water with a tiny bit of chicken stock.
  3. Add the chopped tomatoes, chickpeas, sugar and seasoning to the pan and cook down before adding the saffron stock.
  4. Cook for 15 minutes until the sauce has reduced slightly and tastes good – add more seasoning if it needs it.
  5. Pour a little sauce into the bottom of an oven proof dish followed by the fish fillets and the rest of the sauce.
  6. Bake at 200°C for 10 minutes and serve with salad and warm bread.

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Enjoy!

Remember to donate to Action Against Hunger by following this link:  https://www.justgiving.com/Sophia-Vassie

WORLD FOOD DAY 2015

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Social Protection and Agriculture: Breaking the Cycle of Rural Poverty

This is a special post because today is World Food Day. Established by the Food and Agriculture Organisation UN (FAO) in 1979, World Food Day is held every year on the 16th October the anniversary of date of the founding of the FAO in 1945. This year FAO is celebrating it’s 70th birthday and the UN Secretary General and others are hosting a ceremony at Expo Milano 2015. Every year a different theme is chosen for World Food Day; this year the theme for World Food Day 2015, is “Social Protection and Agriculture: Breaking the Cycle of Rural Poverty”. Member countries will discuss initiatives to develop sustainability in agriculture to work towards eradicating hunger and poverty.

The World Health Organisation says ‘Empowering women farmers could reduce hunger by about 150 million people’.

The objectives of World Food Day are to:

  • encourage attention to agricultural food production and to stimulate national, bilateral, multilateral and non-governmental efforts to this end;
  • encourage economic and technical cooperation among developing countries;
  • encourage the participation of rural people, particularly women and the least privileged categories, in decisions and activities influencing their living conditions;
  • heighten public awareness of the problem of hunger in the world;
  • promote the transfer of technologies to the developing world; and
  • strengthen international and national solidarity in the struggle against hunger, malnutrition and poverty and draw attention to achievements in food and agricultural development.

Risotto alla Milanese

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Rice is the third most cultivated agricultural crop in the word and the most important staple grain. As is the staple food for more than 50% of the world’s population. It provides more than one fifth of the calorie intake for humans worldwide and 20% of daily dietary energy. Although rice is grown across the world, 95% of rice produced for export is produced by smallholding subsistence farms in developing countries with Asia collectively responsible for 87% of global rice production. Post harvest losses due to poor infrastructure such as poor roads and storage facilities, has contributed to farmers loosing notable amounts of income and raising concerns relating to food security.

I’ve chosen to make a recipe from the host city for this year’s FAO ceremony so as not to detract the importance of any of the individual countries on the list.

Legend goes that a young Milanese stained glass window artist sprinkled saffron into the risotto at the wedding of his master’s daughter, the risotto became golden yellow and was instantly a timeless hit. In fact risotto with saffron was first described in writing during the first decade of the 1800s but officially established as ‘Risotto alla Milanese’ by celebrated Milanese chef Felice Lurasci in his 1829 book ‘Nuovo Cuoco Milanese Economico’. Many associate the addition of saffron and it’s golden hue as a symbol of the wealth of Milan; not only is the yellow reminiscent of the precious metal but because saffron is pound for pound actually more expensive than gold. The best thing is that this recipe is such a good excuse to use the saffron I was so kindly donated by Mojgan all the way from Iran!

Ingredients

Risotto alla Milanese

  • Carnaroli rice
  • Saffron
  • Onion
  • Thyme
  • Beef stock
  • Butter
  • Parmesan
  • Salt & Pepper

Method

  1. Soak saffron in a bowl of boiling water. In another bowl prepare stock ready to make your risotto.
  2. For the parmesan crisps, grate parmsan and press down in circles onto baking paper. Place in hot oven and bake until golden the remove and let cool.
  3. Add very finely chopped onion to a pan with melted butter and fresh thyme. Cook slowly till translucent – make sure not to let the onion go brown.
  4. Once softened, add the rice, season with salt & pepper and stir for a few minutes.
  5. Add stock and saffron intermittently to the pan slowly and continuously while stirring the whole time until the risotto is a silky consistency but the rice still has a little bite.
  6. Serve with paremsan crips, fresh thyme and cracked black pepper.

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Enjoy!

Donate here to support their work: https://www.justgiving.com/Sophia-Vassie.

GEORGIA

Georgian Proverb: მდიდარი ჭამა , როდესაც მათ სურთ , ცუდი ჭამა , როცა მათ შეუძლიათ -The rich eat when they want, the poor eat when they can

Georgia is a transcontinental country which lies directly between the most Western point of Asia and Eastern point of Europe. It has been occupied throughout history by many empires including the Roman, Ottoman and Persian due to it’s geographical importance and natural resources. In 1991 Georgia gained independence from the Soviet Union and has since seen several episodes internal conflict and hostility with Russia, most recently in 2008, around the separation of the independent regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia which resulted in the displacement of 250,000 people to date. In 2014 Action Against Hunger helped 46,474 people to gain economic self sufficiency.

Donate here to support their work: https://www.justgiving.com/Sophia-Vassie.

სუფრა

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The ancient trade route the Silk Road which connected Asia and Europe ran through Phazisi in Georgia and although the influence from that is evident in many dishes, Georgia’s cuisine is as independent and distinct as it’s language and culture. Georgian culture is so diverse and each region has it’s own signature dish and I have tried to cook the favourite dishes from  several different regions. One thing that is the same throughout Georgia is the tradition of Supra – an important Georgian feast complete with an elected toastmaster who is responsible for making sure good conversation is always flowing!

Ingredients 

Badrijani Nigvzit

Aubergine and Walnut Rolls

  • Aubergine
  • Walnuts
  • Garlic
  • Coriander
  • Parsley
  • Dill
  • Olive oil
  • Fenugreek
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Water

Khinkali

Georgian Dumplings

  • Flour
  • Water
  • Beef mince
  • Red onion
  • Chilli flakes
  • Fenugreek
  • Coriander
  • Salt & Pepper

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Tabaka

Garlic Chicken

  • Chicken wings
  • Garlic
  • Cayenne Pepper
  • Olive oil
  • Butter
  • Salt & Pepper

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Lobio

Kidney Bean Stew

  • Kidney beans
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Onion
  • Chilli
  • Fenugreek
  • Paprika
  • Olive oil
  • Coriander
  • Parsley
  • Vegetable stock
  • Salt & Pepper

Badrijnis Khizilala

Aubergine Caviar

  • Aubergine
  • Cherry Tomato
  • Coriander
  • Olive oil
  • Salt & Pepper

Pkhali

Spinach and Walnut Spread

  • Spinach
  • Walnuts
  • Coriander
  • Garlic
  • Olives
  • Fenugreek
  • Turmeric
  • Pomegranate
  • White wine vinegar
  • Red onion
  • Sugar
  • Olive oil
  • Salt & Pepper

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Acharuli Khachapuri

Georgian Cheese and Egg Bread

  • Flour
  • Water
  • Yeast
  • Sugar
  • Olive oil
  • Feta
  • Hard mozzarella
  • Dill
  • Eggs
  • Butter
  • Salt & Pepper

Method

Badrijani Nigvzit

Aubergine and Walnut Rolls

  1. Chop the ends off and slice aubergines length ways – Don’t worry if some slices break or come out uneven, use them in the aubergine caviar dish!
  2. Put a splash of olive oil in a griddle pan and grill the aubergine slices on each side. Once cooked season and set aside to cool.
  3. In a mini chopper whiz up the garlic, coriander, parsley, dill, fenugreek, olive oil and salt & pepper. Add a little water to make into a paste.
  4. When the aubergine slices have cooled, roll some paste into each slice and dress with coriander leaves and pomegranate seeds.

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Khinkali

Georgian Dumplings

  1. First make the dumpling dough by mixing flour, salt and warm water into an elastic dough. Knead for 5 minutes then wrap in clingfilm and put in the fridge for at least 1 hour.
  2. In a bowl add red onion, mince, chilli flakes, fenugreek, coriander and salt & pepper and mix with your hands to form a coarse paste.
  3. When ready dust the worktop with flour. Take handfuls of dough and form into balls, with a rolling pin roll the circles and place a ball of the mince mixture in the middle then close the dough completely over to form dumplings. Keep going this way till all the mince is finished.
  4.  To cook add the dumplings to a pan of boiling salted water until the dumplings float and the doughs become slightly translucent – I used the water from steaming the spinach for the pkhali dish plus some extra.
  5. Meanwhile in a mini chopper add salt, coriander and olive oil to make a dressing.
  6. When cooked drain the dumplings and dress with coriander oil and chilli flakes.

Tabaka

Garlic Chicken

In Georgia this dish is traditionally made by putting a brick on top of the chicken to ensure maximum crisp and even cooking!

  1. Add salt, cayenne pepper a little olive oil and the cloves of a whole bulb of garlic to a pestle and mortar and pound into a paste – Adding salt helps to break down the garlic to give a smoother paste! 
  2. Rub the paste well into chicken wings and leave in the fridge to marinate for up to 2 hours – This dish is traditionally made with small flattened out chickens but chicken wings are so good for sharing. 
  3. Add a little olive oil to a hot pan and place the wings skin side down. Place another saucepan on top of the wings then put a pestle and mortar, or any other heavy object, on top of the second pan to way it down.
  4. After 5 minutes check the chicken is crisping up and throw in some butter. The chicken should have miraculously coloured on both sides but if it hasn’t feel free to turn it over and place the weight back on.
  5. Once cooked serve with fresh chopped parsley and a drizzle of the garlicky buttery pan juices.

Lobio

Kidney Bean Stew

  1. In mini chopper whiz up carrot, red onion and celery until very fine. – This mix is called ‘mirepoix’ and is actually the chubakabra of stews and sauces. Use this in a bolognese sauce and you’ll never, ever cook without it again. 
  2. Add the mirepoix to heated olive oil and sweat on a low heat.
  3. Once the mirepoix has sweated slightly add chopped coriander, a generous spoonful of paprika, chopped fresh chilli and fenugreek then cook keep cooking. After about five minutes add kidney beans and stock then stew on a low heat for 45 minutes adding more water if necessary. Season to taste.
  4. In a mini chopper blend walnuts and olive oil into a paste.
  5. When the stew is ready blend with a hand blender – Don’t worry about it being chunky, it’s much better that way!
  6. Stir in the walnut paste and your Lobio is ready! – This stew is delicious hot or cold, just serve with fresh chopped parsley, paprika and warm bread.

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Badrijnis Khizilala

Aubergine Caviar

  1. Place the roughly cut bits of the left over aubergine, and a whole new aubergine if you like, on a baking tray with salt & pepper and olive oil and put in a hot oven to roast.
  2. Half way through cooking add cherry tomatoes to the same tray.
  3. It will be cooked when soft, remove from oven and leave to cool.
  4. When cool squeeze the tomatoes from their skins into a bowl – They will be the sweetest, nicest things ever.
  5. Scrap the flesh of the aubergine from it’s skin and roughly chop. Mix in with the tomatoes and add chopped fresh coriander.
  6. You only need to season slightly to retain the freshness and sweetness. That’s it, no olive oil or anything!

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Pkhali

Spinach and Walnut Spread

These little spinach balls are like perfect sized individual servings. You pick up a ball, put it on your bread then spread and enjoy!

  1. To make pickled red onion just finely chop onion rings and add to white wine vinegar and sugar then set aside till ready to use.
  2. Add water to a pan and bring to the boil, steam the spinach until wilted – I just put the spinach in a colander and the colander on top of the pan to steam.
  3. In a mini chopper whiz up walnuts, garlic, coriander, white wine vinegar, fenugreek, and salt & pepper.
  4. When wilted take the colander of spinach and run under cold water – This shock  of rapid cooling will retain the green colour and stop the spinach darkening. It’s also good for all other green veg (think pea purée) – once it’s ‘shocked’ it can be heated again and will still be a really bright green!
  5. Retain the water in the saucepan to cook your dumplings in later.
  6. Once cold sqeeze out all the excess liquid from the spinach and add to the mini chopper with the paste. Coarsely chop.
  7. Once well mixed roll into little balls ready for individual spreading!
  8. Serve with pomegranate seeds and pickled red onion rings.

Acharuli Khachapuri

Georgian Cheese and Egg Bread

  1. Mix a tablespoon of yeast and a teaspoon of sugar with warm water, set aside for 20 minutes until the mixture becomes foamy.
  2. Add flour, oil and salt then with a wooden spoon mix into a dough. Transfer to a floured work top and knead for 5 minutes.
  3. Return to a slightly oiled bowl, cover with cling film and place in a warm place for at least 2 hours. The dough should be ready when it’s doubled in size.
  4. In a bowl mix together crumbled feta cheese, hard mozzarella cheese, dill and salt & pepper.
  5. When the dough is ready roll out and form into a boat shape, there should be clear edges which will form a higher crust. Cover a tray with baking paper and place the boat on top. – If you have a pizza stone, that is the thing to use!
  6. Put the cheese mix in the middle of the boat and put in a hot oven.
  7. Once the cheese has melted and the dough has mostly cooked take the bread out and paint the crust with egg yolk. Crack a whole egg on top of the cheese mix in the centre of the boat then return to oven.
  8. When the bread is golden and the egg white is cooked take the boat out of the oven. The egg yolk should still be runny! Serve with fresh dill and a sprinkle of paprika.

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Enjoy!

Remember to donate to Action Against Hunger by following this link:  https://www.justgiving.com/Sophia-Vassie

REFUGEE’S CRISIS

This is a slightly different post to the others. This time I dedicate the dishes and my donation to the people currently seeking refuge in Europe. Not a specific country but to the millions of displaced people currently trying to bring their family’s to safety.

According to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) there are over 20 million registered refugees in the world and over 60 million people who have been forcibly displaced. UNHCR calculated that in 2014 42,500 people had to leave their homes, often in other countries to find safety – every single day.

It is reported that this year approximately 400,000 people have travelled to Europe to seek refuge from their home countries due to conflict and persecution.

Developing countries are host to 86% of the world’s refugees. Last year the UK took in 400 Syrian refugees, Turkey took in 1.6 million. So why do we keep hearing about ‘the refugee crisis’. The construction of the sentence suggests a negative situation brought on by refugees – the intention of the sentence does too. We should be saying ‘the refugee’s crisis’. This is certainly a crisis, but not for Europeans. For the people who, often running, having left everything and everyone behind them with no opportunity to turn their heads and look back. For the children who make up 51% of Syrian refugees, the crisis is that their homes have burned and they are now not only ‘someone else’s problem’ but that someone else is saying that their existence and their struggle, will create problems for the very people with whom they seek refuge.

People talking about ‘protecting our freedom from the threat of terrorism’ have clearly not thought about the fact that without exception all the refugees fleeing to Europe are doing so not from the ‘threat of terrorism’ but from real, physical terrorism which has murdered, plundered and destroyed their beloved lands, cultures and histories. The people making these ignorant comments have no concept of what freedom is having never had to lose or struggle or pine or die for it.

There is no refugee crisis, only the refugee’s crisis. This world is not anyone’s, it’s everyone’s and where there is ground to stand on all humans should be entitled to stand regardless of whether they were born on that spot or not.

For this post as well as donating to Action Against Hunger, I have donated to the charity CalAid who are supporting refugees in Calais. In addition to fundraising online: https://crowdfunding.justgiving.com/CalAid they are also hosting drop off days for people to donate clothes, tents and bedding – check out their website for dates and locations near you.

I will also be attending the Solidarity with Refugees march on Saturday 12th September, starting in Park Lane and ending up outside Downing Street.

Join me there and show your support.

مجموعة مختارة من الأطباق      
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For this post I had initially decided to cook Lebanon – that is I had decided to cook what most people think of as ‘Lebanese’ food. It’s not that it’s not Lebanese food, it’s just that it also happens to be the food I grew up with from my Egyptian mum and the food which has variations of the same dishes all over North Africa and the Levant; stuffed vine leaves and vegetables, dips, salads and all the other delicious things everybody recognises and loves. So when I was deciding which country on the list to attribute these foods to I narrowed it down to Lebanon because of that and because I knew exactly what I was doing for Syria and Palestine. I have a very personal, emotional and cultural attachment to the food, people and region so I also knew that these blog posts would be more than just facts with a recipe attached. I don’t have to research any recipes or learn about the reasons why Action Against Hunger have a presence there. These are universal recipes which represent more than just one country – I will resume the challenge country by country and pick a Lebanese specific recipe to replace this post.

When I started this challenge I had the idea that I didn’t want the blog to be too personal, I wanted it to be about facts and food. I just wanted to state the reason why I was doing it, where the donations where going and why and the recipe – my opinion didn’t have to come in to it. But actually I’ve realised that I can’t do that so here are some facts, my opinion and some recipes, which while clearly Arabic, are for everyone no matter where they are from.

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Ingredients

Hummous

  • Chickpeas
  • Tahini
  • Garlic
  • Olive oil
  • Lemon Juice
  • Paprika
  • Salt & Pepper

Mahshi Warak ‘Inab (Egyptian Style)

  • Grape vine leaves
  • Egyptian Rice
  • Onion
  • Stock
  • Garlic
  • Chopped tomatoes
  • Dill
  • Coriander
  • Parsley
  • Potato
  • Cumin
  • Salt & Pepper

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Tabbouleh (Lebanese Style with a touch of Palestine)

  • Bulgur wheat or Freekeh
  • Tomato
  • Parsley
  • Olive oil
  • Lemon juice
  • Zaa’tar
  • Cucumber
  • Mint
  • Radish
  • Cumin
  • Sumac
  • Salt & Pepper

Muhammara

  • Red pepper
  • Walnuts
  • Olive oil
  • Lemon juice
  • Harissa
  • Salt & Pepper

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Kofta 

  • Lamb mince
  • Onion
  • Toasted Bulgar wheat or Freekeh
  • Cumin
  • Zaa’tar
  • All spice
  • Parlsey
  • Salt & Pepper

Baba Ghanoush

  • Aubergine
  • Lemon juice
  • Tahini
  • Sumac
  • Olive oil
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Rose petals

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Spinach & Feta and Lamb Borek

  • Cumin
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Mint
  • Feta cheese
  • Spinach
  • —-
  • Lamb mince
  • Onion
  • Pine nuts
  • Cinnamon
  • Cumin
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Olive oil
  • —-
  • Filo pastry
  • Clarified or melted butter

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Method

Hummous

  1. Take a tin of chickpeas and add some of the water from the tin into a food processor. Drain the rest of the chickpeas and leave a handful aside – add the rest to the food processor.
  2. Add a clove or two of garlic, olive oil, a couple of tables spoons of tahini, lemon juice and salt and pepper then blend until smooth.
  3. Taste and add any more of anything if needed.
  4. Put aside until ready to eat – just before serving garnish with extra olive oil, the whole chickpeas and paprika.

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Mahshi Warak ‘Inab (Egyptian Style)

  1. Soak brined vine leaves in water – leave them soaking while you complete following steps.
  2. Using who bunches, remove the stalks from the parsley and dill. Chop the end of the stalks of the coriander – Coriander stalks carry a lot of flavour and are very good to use in cooking!
  3. In a mini chopper (or with great knife skills) blend or finely dice an onion, garlic and the herbs.
  4. In a hot pan with oil cook off the rice slightly so it’s no longer translucent but white all the way through – I do this every time I cook rice for a fail safe way to avoid ‘stodge’.
  5. Once the rice is white add the onion and herb mixture, sweat off for a bit then add a small tin of chopped tomatoes,cumin and salt & pepper.
  6. Take the pan off the heat and transfer the rice into a bowl.
  7. Without peeling, slice a potato into thin circles and place at the bottom of the same pan. This will prevent the Mahshi from sticking to the bottom and burning.
  8. Drain the soaked vine leaves and rinse off with cold water. One by one you can begin to stuff the vine leaves with the rice mixture. – It is important to cut away the tiny bit at the bottom of the leaf where the stalk would attach to the plant – this makes it easier to roll.
  9. Put some of the rice mixture in the the centre of the vine leaf. Roll up from the bottom then fold in the sides and continue rolling till you have a sausage shape which is closed on all side. It’s ok if there are some which don’t close on the sides, every leaf is different!
  10. As you roll add the mahshi to the pan placing tightly together so there are no gaps – you should get several stacks on top of one another.
  11. Once you have finished filling the saucepan add stock to just above the mahshi. Simmer on a low heat until the rice is cooked.

N.B. This rice mixture can be used to stuff LITERALLY any vegetable you can make a hole in. 

Tabbouleh (Lebanese Style with a touch of Palestine)

  1. First of all bring a pan to high heat without any oil, add the bulgur wheat or Palestinian freekeh and toast until they smell lovely and nutty. Once toasted take off the heat and transfer into a bowl to cool.
  2. Chop cucumbers, radishes and tomatoes into small cubes – I use only the flesh of the cucumber and tomato to stop the salad going soggy. You can use the juicy bit of the tomato in your mahshi and if you add the juicy bit of the cucumber to water you get a drink that’s a million times better than Lucazade with the same effect!
  3. Take a lot of mint and parsley and remove the leaves from the stalks, chop very finely and add to the chopped veg. By now your wheat should have cooled and you can mix that in too.
  4. In a separate bowl make a dressing of olive oil, zaa’tar, lemon juice, cumin, sumac, salt & pepper – I also like to add a pinch of sugar to bring out the sweetness of the tomato.
  5. Mix well with the salad and serve with an extra wedge of lemon.

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Muhammara

  1. Chop red peppers into large chunks. Add olive oil and salt & pepper and cook in a hot oven.
  2. They are ready when they are soft and slightly charred on the outside.
  3. Put the peppers in a mini chopper with a generous amount of walnuts, Also add lemon juice, olive oil, harissa and salt & pepper, then blend.
  4. Set aside until ready. When ready garnish with olive oil and lightly crushed and whole walnuts.

Kofta 

  1. In a mini chopper blend onion, parsley, lamb mince, a little bulgar or freekeh, cumin, zaa’tar, all spice and salt & pepper until smooth. Roll into egg shapes and put in the fridge.
  2. When ready to cook just drop the eggs into hot vegetable oil to deep fry. Serve immediately.

Baba Ghanoush

  1. Poke holes in an aubergine and put into a hot oven covered in foil. Do other things will this cooks.
  2. Just before removing the aubergine from the oven, juice two lemons.
  3. Once it’s cooked, you can tell because when you poke it it’s soft, remove from the heat an let cool for a about a minute.
  4. Cut open the aubergine and scrape the flesh into a mini chopper. Immediately add the lemon juice – this stops the aubergine from oxidising and turning browny/grey.
  5. Add tahini, sumac olive oil and salt & pepper then blend until smooth. It doesn’t have to be a paste though!
  6. Set aside until ready to serve. When ready garnish with olive oil, sumac and dried rose petals.

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Borek

  1. Dry toast pine nuts in a frying pan, removed to one side. In the same pan add finely diced onion to olive oil and sweat.
  2. Once softened add lamb mince, cumin, cinnamon, salt & pepper. once the mixture is cooked through remove from the pan and set to one side.
  3. In a separate bowl add crumbled feta, olive oil, fresh spinach, cumin, chopped mint and salt & pepper. Mix well.
  4. Lay out a pack of filo pastry and cut in half – one half will be for lamb and the other for spinach. Split the two halves into equal parts of leaves to make individual cigars.
  5. Taking a pastry brush, brush either clarified butter or melted butter on to each individual layer of filo pastry. Once done add some filling and roll up brushing with butter as you go – this will prevent it from unravelling. Place on a baking tray.
  6. Do this until both bowls of mixture are finished. Put the rolled borek in the oven and cook until the pastry is golden. Serve immediately.

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