IRAQI KURDISTAN

Kurdish Proverb: A zikê birçî tune guhên – A hungry stomach has no ears  

Kurdistan is located in the North of Iraq and was officially formed in 1970 after years of ethnic violence between the Kurdish people and the Arab Iraqi government. Peace did not last and since mid 1970 Kurds have faced continuous attack from the dominant government. Genocides ordered by Saddam Hussein during both the Iran-Iraq war and in 1991 devastated the Kurdish population. Since the death of Saddam Hussein and the withdrawal of US troops, tensions between the Kurds and Arabs have remained. More recently Kurdistan has seen an influx of more than 2 million displaced Iraqi and Syrian refugees fleeing war and settling in the region.

In 2014 Action Against Hunger helped 297,082 with access to clean water and  providing women and children with mental health support.

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Fasolia and Rice 

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As with many of the dishes from the Middle Eastern region, this dish really reminds me of the food I ate growing up. Kurdistan actually lies in between Iraq and Iran and the food in differs depending on the proximity to those two countries. Iraqi Kurdish food is very similar to the cuisines found in the gulf and this white bean stew is no exception. Dishes are usually served with vermicelli rice and various side salads.

Ingredients

Serves 4

  • 6 cloves of garlic
  • 70g concentrated tomato paste
  • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tin berlotti beans
  • 1 tin butter beans
  • 2 tsps cumin
  • 3 tbls ghee or vegetable oil
  • 1 portion vegetable stock
  • 1 cup of rice
  • 1/2 cup of vermicelli
  • Salt & pepper

Method

In a pestle and mortar crush garlic with a little salt until smooth. Add crushed garlic to hot 1 tablespoon of hot ghee or oil and cook gently for 1 minute. Once golden add tomato paste and stir then add 3 cups of boiled water. Cook gently for 10 minutes before adding chopped tomatoes, stock and cumin then leave to simmer for 20 minutes.

While the sauce is simmering, make rice. Fry vermicelli in one tablespoon of hot ghee or oil until brown then add rice and a pinch of salt. Once the rice has become white cover until a centimetre above with boiling water. Turn down the heat as far as possible, cover and leave to cook for 15 minutes. Once cooked, turn off the heat and leave the lid on –  the steam will keep the rice warm and prevent it from going claggy.

Your sauce should have reduced by now. Add the tinned beans (you can use soaked dried beans of course!) and cook for a further 5 minutes.

Serve with rice and fresh chopped parsley. I also had some pickled chillis and fresh radish on the side which is great!

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Enjoy!

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SOUTH SUDAN

South Sudanese Proverb: Better a meal of vegetables where there is love than a fatted ox where there is hatred 

South Sudan is one of the world’s ‘youngest’ countries having gained independence from Sudan in 2011. Since 2013 South Sudan has faced violent civil conflict within it’s newly established borders leaving over 2 million of it’s population displaced as refugees, many of them in neighbouring countries. With a total population of only 11.56 million, 66% are affected by food scarcity and chronic malnutrition – the highest percentage of any population in the world. In 2014 Action Against Hunger have helped 447,217 people, predominantly in getting access to safe water.

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Pasipasi kpedekpede na passio

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The food in Sudan is very similar to that of it’s Nile River neighbour Egypt and is heavily influenced by Arabic culture. The food in South Sudan however, more closely reflects the food of it’s neighbours in Kenya and DR Congo. Peanuts feature heavily as do sweet potatoes, yams and sorghum (a type of grain). Here I’ve made one of the most popular South Sudanese dishes – spinach, sweet potato and peanut stew which would normally be served with rice, couscous or sorghum. Due the price of meat, beef would normally only be added on special occasions – I had some left over beef short rib so this is a special occasion Pasipasi kpedekpede na passio.

Ingredients

Pasipasi kpedekpede na passio

  • Rice
  • Vegetable oil
  • Sweet potato
  • Garlic
  • Fresh tomato
  • Spinach
  • Tomato puree
  • Stock cubes – Maggi brand is the famous stock cube used in Africa – it’s very salty so it works as seasoning too!
  • Peanut butter
  • Palm oil
  • Peanuts
  • Beef (optional)

Tomato Salad with Peanut and Lime Dressing

  • Fresh Tomatoes
  • Parsley
  • Sugar
  • Salt
  • Chilli
  • Pepper
  • Peanut butter
  • Lime
  • Olive oil

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Method

Pasipasi kpedekpede na passio

  1. First put on some rice – heat some vegetable oil in a pan and boil the kettle. Add uncooked rice and salt to the oil and fry until the rice toasts and becomes white, once all the rice is equally toasted add boiled water to up to  cm and half above the top of the rice, cover and low the heat completely.
  2. Peel and cut sweet potatoes into chunks and add to a pan with palm oil, fry on all sides then add chopped garlic.
  3. In a bowl add boiled water to Maggi stock cubes to dissolve – add the whole thing to the pan with some fresh chopped tomatoes, tomato puree and let the mixture cook and the sweet potato braise.
  4. At this stage I added the meat from some left over beef short ribs and added a bone to the pan for flavour – if you don’t have cooked meat, brown some beef at the beginning before adding the other ingredients then just cook as before, alternatively don’t put any meat in at all!
  5. Turn off the rice but don’t remove the lid, the steam will finish the last bit of cooking.
  6. The liquid should now have reduced a little and have good flavour! Stir in quite a bit of peanut butter so that the sauce thickens.
  7. Once the sauce is a good consistency pop a pile of spinach on top – the steam from the stew will cook it down and you’ll be able to mix it in after about 30 seconds.
  8. Crush some peanuts and serve on top of your stew with rice.

Tomato Salad with Peanut and Lime Dressing

  1. Chop fresh tomatoes roughly and finely chop fresh parsley, mix together in a bowl an sprinkle a little sugar to bring out the flavour. – This also helps to release the juice from the tomato so it literally creates it’s own dressing anyway!
  2. In a separate bowl squeeze a lime and add a tablespoon of peanut butter to the juice with olive oil, finely chopped chilli, salt and pepper.
  3. When you’re ready to serve spoon some dressing over the salad.

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Enjoy!

Remember to donate to Action Against Hunger by following this link:  https://www.justgiving.com/Sophia-Vassie